JENNIFER MAC

blog recipes

Recipes in this section include both raw food and whole "cooked" food recipes.  Many of these recipes will be plant-based along with a portion having animal-based products, often including a vegan or vegetarian option.  From my background and experience to the classes I've taught and in-home training, I cover many special types of food preferences from vegan to paleo to low glycemic (low sugar), meeting a wide range of deliciously healthy food connoisseurs.  

Nut Milk Basics

This step-by-step guide in making your own nut and seed milks was featured in Global Gourmet magazine (August 2015 issue) and is in The Right Blend: Blender-only Raw Food Recipes.

People choose to go off dairy for different reasons.  Some have a difficult time digesting lactose.  Others seek a plant-based diet free from meats and animal byproducts, such as dairy milks and cheeses. 

Personally, I consume some dairy based milks, such as kefir or our local raw cow or goat's milk.  Most find it downright impossible to be one-hundred percent dairy free due to the irresistible pleasures from milks and creams.  However, creams can be made from almost any type of nut or seed so if you are going dairy-free, you may be pleasantly surprised!

 

Soaking nuts and seeds releases enzyme inhibitors and makes them more digestible.

Soaking nuts and seeds releases enzyme inhibitors and makes them more digestible.

Steps in Making Nut and Seed Milks

Step 1 – Soaking

Directions:  Soak nuts or seeds in water, drain, and rinse.

Soaking starts the germination process, releasing tannins and neutralizing enzyme inhibitors.  Soaking not only allows the body to better absorb nutrients.  The soaking time depends on size.

Step 2 – Blending

Directions:  Blend the nuts or seeds with pure water to form a thick mixture.

The ratio of nuts and seeds to water depends on the creaminess desired.  For milk, use one part nuts to three parts water.  For cream, use one part nuts to one or two parts water.  Blend in a favorite sweetener if desired.

Using a Nut Milk Bag (or Cheese Cloth) to Strain the Milk

Using a Nut Milk Bag (or Cheese Cloth) to Strain the Milk

Step 3 – Straining

Directions:  Pour the liquid mixture into a bowl lined with a nut milk bag or cheesecloth.  With one hand holding the top of the bag, use the other hand to gently squeeze from the bottom.  A Chinese mesh cloth, used for steaming buns or making tofu works similar to cheesecloth.  For some creams, such as cashew cream, straining is not needed.

Step 4 – Saving Pulp

Directions:  Store the leftover nut and seed pulp in a sealed bag or airtight container in the freezer up to 2 months.  The nutritious pulp leftover can be used as flour in muffins, cookies and breads.